Easy Guide: How to say Forgotten in Japanese

If you’re interested in learning how to say “forgotten” in Japanese, you’ve come to the right place. This comprehensive guide will provide you with all the information you need to express the concept of “forgotten” in Japanese accurately. Whether you want to enhance your language skills or navigate conversations effortlessly, this guide has got you covered. So, let’s dive in and explore the Japanese word for “forgotten,” it’s meaning, how to express it, and more.

Understanding the Concept of “Forgotten” in Japanese

Before we delve into the Japanese translation of “forgotten,” it’s crucial to understand the concept behind it. In Japanese, there are several ways to express the idea of forgetting or being forgotten, each with its nuances and implications.

The most basic Japanese term for “forgotten” is “wasureru,” which means “to forget.” It is the verb form of the noun “wasureta,” which means “forgotten.”

However, depending on the context, you may need to use other expressions. For instance, if you want to say that something has been forgotten for a long time, you can use the expression “kioku ni nokoru,” which means “to remain in memory,” and implies that the thing has been forgotten by most people.

Additional Expressions

Here are some other terms that may be useful in different contexts when it comes to expressing the idea of “forgotten” in Japanese:

Japanese Term Meaning
boukyaku oblivion; lapse of memory
wasurerareru to be forgotten by someone
saraba farewell; goodbye

As you can see, there are many ways to express the concept of “forgotten” in Japanese, depending on the context and what you want to convey.

Translating “Forgotten” to Japanese

Now that we have a basic understanding of the concept of “forgotten” in Japanese, let’s learn how to translate it into Japanese. There are several ways to express the idea of forgetting or being forgotten in Japanese, and we’ll explore the most commonly used words and phrases below.

Japanese Word/Phrase English Meaning
忘れる (wasureru) To forget
忘れられる (wasurerareru) To be forgotten
忘却 (boukyaku) Oblivion; the state of being forgotten
忘年会 (bounenkai) A year-end party where people forget the worries of the past year

The most basic and commonly used way to say “forgotten” in Japanese is “忘れられる” (wasureareru). This phrase implies that someone or something has been forgotten by someone else. For example, if you were not invited to a party and you feel forgotten, you could say “私は招待されていないので、忘れられたと感じています” (Watashi wa shoutai sarete inai node, wasure rareta to kanjite imasu), which means “I feel forgotten because I wasn’t invited.”

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Another way to say “forgotten” in Japanese is by using the verb “忘れる” (waseru), which means “to forget.” For example, if you forget to bring something important to a meeting and no one reminds you, you could say “大事な書類を忘れてきてしまって、みんなに忘れられた” (daiji na shorui o wasurete kite shimatte, minna ni wasurerareta), which means “I forgot to bring an important document and everyone forgot about it.”

Other Japanese words related to forgetting include “忘却” (boukyaku), which means “oblivion” or “the state of being forgotten,” and “忘年会” (bounenkai), which is a year-end party where people forget the worries of the past year and enjoy themselves with colleagues or friends.

With these expressions in mind, you can now confidently translate the concept of “forgotten” into Japanese and use them in various situations.

Expressing the Meaning of “Forgotten” in Japanese

Now that we know the various words and phrases used to translate “forgotten” into Japanese, it’s important to understand how to express the meaning accurately in different contexts. Depending on the situation, you may need to use different expressions to convey the idea of being forgotten or forgetting something.

The Japanese language has many subtle nuances, so it’s essential to use the appropriate words and phrases. For instance, if you are talking about forgetting someone’s name, you can use “namae wo wasureta” (名前を忘れた) to express that you have forgotten their name. On the other hand, if you want to convey the feeling of being forgotten by someone, you can use “wasurete shimatta” (忘れてしまった) to express that you feel forgotten or left out.

Another example of expressing the meaning of “forgotten” in Japanese is when you want to say that something has been left behind or forgotten. In this case, you can use “wasureru” (忘れる) to express that something has been forgotten or left behind. For instance, if you left your bag at home, you can say “Kaban wo uchi ni wasurete kita” (カバンを家に忘れてきた) to express that you left your bag at home.

Useful Phrases

English Japanese Pronunciation
I forgot Wasuremashita wah-sure-eh-mah-she-tah
I forgot your name Anata no namae wo wasuremashita ah-nah-tah no nah-mah-eh wo wah-sure-eh-mah-she-tah
I feel forgotten Wasurete shimatta ki ga suru wah-sure-eh-teh shee-mah-tah kee gah soo-roo
Did you forget? Wasureta? wah-sure-eh-tah?

By using these phrases, you can accurately express the meaning of “forgotten” in Japanese and communicate effectively in different situations.

Pronunciation of “Forgotten” in Japanese

Now that you have learned how to translate “forgotten” into Japanese, it’s time to master the pronunciation. The Japanese word for “forgotten” is “wasureru” (忘れる).

Here’s a breakdown of how to pronounce each syllable:

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Japanese Romanization Pronunciation
wa Like the “wa” in “water”
re Like the “re” in “red”
ru Like the “roo” in “roof”

When saying “wasureru” in Japanese, remember to put emphasis on the second syllable.

Practice saying “wasureru” out loud using the provided pronunciations as a guide. With some practice and dedication, you’ll be able to say “forgotten” in Japanese accurately and confidently.

Putting “Forgotten” into Practice

Now that you have learned how to say “forgotten” in Japanese, it’s time to put your knowledge into practice. Below are some practical examples and scenarios where you can use these expressions in conversations:

Scenario Japanese Expression English Translation
You forgot your friend’s birthday 友達の誕生日を忘れた I forgot my friend’s birthday
You left your phone at home 携帯を家に忘れた I forgot my phone at home
You can’t remember a word その言葉を思い出せない I can’t remember that word

Remember that the Japanese language has many nuances, so the appropriate expression can vary depending on the context. Practice using these expressions with native speakers to improve your understanding and fluency.

Summary and Conclusion

Congratulations! You have learned how to say “forgotten” in Japanese, and now have the tools to navigate conversations effortlessly. By understanding the concept and different terms used to express “forgotten” in Japanese, you can accurately convey your meaning in various contexts.

You have also learned the most commonly used words and phrases to translate “forgotten” into Japanese, as well as the correct pronunciation. By putting this knowledge into practice and applying it to real-life situations, you can enhance your language skills and communicate more effectively.

FAQ

Q: How do I say “forgotten” in Japanese?

A: The word for “forgotten” in Japanese is 忘れられた (wasure rareta).

Q: What are the different ways to express forgetting in Japanese?

A: In Japanese, there are several terms to express the concept of forgetting or being forgotten, including 忘れる (wasureru), 忘却する (boukyaku suru), and 忘れ去る (wasuresaru).

Q: Can you provide some practical examples of using these expressions?

A: Sure! For example, you can say 忘れてしまった (wasurete shimatta) to convey “I forgot” or 忘れ去られた (wasure sarareta) to mean “I have been forgotten.”

Q: How do I pronounce the word for “forgotten” in Japanese?

A: The pronunciation of “wasure rareta” is wah-su-reh rah-reh-tah.

Q: Are there any other words or phrases related to “forgotten” in Japanese?

A: Yes, other related words or phrases include 忘却感 (boukyaku kan), which means “sense of forgetting,” and 忘年会 (bounenkai), which refers to the year-end party where people forget about their worries.

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